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Goundla Srinivas
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Goundla Srinivas

Post-doctoral Research Fellow (2009 - 2011)

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY
PO BOX 2008 MS6309
OAK RIDGE TN 37831-6309

Oak Ridge , TN 37831-6309

Education:

  1. 2002-2006 Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
  2. 1997-2002 Ph.D., Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore, India
  3. 1995-1997 MS, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India
  4. INDUSTRIAL EXPERIENCE:
  5. 2006-2009 Postdoctoral Researcher, IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose

Biography:

 

Research Interests:

Self-assembly is a process by which molecules assemble to form regularized and well defined morphologies from a disordered state. It is amazing that generally, there are no external factors such as pH or electric fields are not involved and the self-assembly process is solely governed by specific interactions among molecules. Examples from biology include lipid membrane formation, tobacco mosaic virus tubular formation etc. Material world adopting these principles to create novel type of materials which would have been impossible to realize otherwise. Thanks to self-assembly, many nanotechnological applications (which could have been only imagined) are a reality now.

 

 Nanotechnology is aggressively applied to wide range of problems in physics, chemistry, biology and materials science. Recent research is focussing on the use of nanotechnology applications in renewable energy research. As such our research focuses on biofuels, in particular cellulose biomass recalcitrans. Cellulose is most abudant form of biomass energy on earth. Yet, neither the structure nor the properties are fully understood todate. Our friend, self-assembly plays a critical role in the formation of cellulose from single biopolymers that inturn made of glucose monomer units. Our current research focuses on understanding the structure and function of cellulose from a molecular view point. Towards this goal we are involved in developing large scale coarse grain models for cellulose and related biomolecules. 

 

  Publications:

 

  1. Distance and orientation dependence of excitation energy transfer: From molecular systems to metal nanoparticles, Sangeetha Saini, G. Srinivas, and B. Bagchi, Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 113, 1817 (2009).

  2. Soft Patchy Nanoparticles from Solution-phase Self-assembly of Binary Diblock Copolymers G. Srinivas, and J.W. Pitera, Nanoletters, 8, 611 (2008).

  3. Interfacial Fluctuations of Block Copolymers: A Coarse-Grain Molecular Dynamics Simulations Study. G. Srinivas, W.C. Swope and J.W. Pitera, Journal of Physial Chemistry B, 111, 13734 (2007).

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of self-assembly and nanotube formation by amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solution: a coarse-grain approach, G. Srinivas and M.L. Klein, Nanotechnology, 18, 205703 (2007).

  5. Emerging applications of polymersomes in delivery: From molecular dynamics to shrinkage of tumors. D.E. Discher, V. Ortiz, G. Srinivas, M. L. Klein, Y. Kim, D. Christian, S. Cai, P. Photos and F. Ahmed, Progress in Polymer Science, 32, 838 (2007).

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Surfactant Self-Organization at a Solid-Liquid Interface
    G. Srinivas, S. O. Nielsen, P. B. Moore, and M.L. Klein, Journal of American Chemical Society, 128, 848 (2006).

  7. Key roles for chain flexibility in block copolymer membranes that contain pores or make tubes
    G. Srinivas, D.E. Discher and M.L. Klein, Nano Letters, 5, 2343 (2005) (Cover Article).

  8. Probing Membrane Insertion Activity of Antimicrobial Polymers via Coarse-Grain Molecular Dynamics. C. F. Lopez, S. O. Nielsen, G. Srinivas, W. F. De Grado, and M.L. Klein, Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, 2, 649 (2006).

  9. Shrinkage of a Rapidly Growing Tumor by Drug-Loaded Polymersomes: pH-Triggered Release through Copolymer Degradation. F. Ahmed, R. I. Pakunlu G. Srinivas, A. Brannan, F. Bates, M. L. Klein, T. Minko, and D. E. Discher, Molecular Pharmaceutics, 3, 340 (2006).

  10. Modeling surfactant adsorption on solid surfaces, S.O. Nilesen, G. Srinivas C. F Lopez and M.L. Klein, Physical Review Letters, 94, 228301 (2005).

  11. Self-assembly and properties of diblock copolymers via coarse grain molecular dynamics simulations. G. Srinivas D.E. Discher and M.L. Klein, Nature Materials, 3, 638 (2004).

  12. Computational approaches to nanobiotechnology: Probing the interaction of synthetic molecules with phospholipid bilayers via a coarse-grain model. G. Srinivas and M.L. Klein, Nanotechnology, 15, 1289 (2004).

  13. Simulation of diblock copolymer self-assembly using a coarse-grain model. G. Srinivas, J. C Shelley, S.O. Nielsen, D.E. Discher and M.L. Klein, Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 108, 8153 (2004).

  14. Incorporating a hydrophobic solid into a coarse-grain liquid framework: Graphite in an aqueous amphiphilic environment, S. Nielsen, G. Srinivas, M L Klein, , Journal of Chemical Physics, 123, 124907 (2005).

  15.   Bridging the time scales by coarse grain molecular dynamics simulations. S.O Nielsen, C. F Lopez. G. Srinivas and M.L. Klein, Journal of Physics: C (Condensed Matter), 16, R481 (2004).

  16. Coarse-grain molecular dynamics simulations of diblock copolymer surfactants interacting with a lipid bilayer. G. Srinivas and M.L. Klein, Molecular Physics, 102, 883 (2004).

  17. A coarse-grain model for n-alkanes parameterized from surface tension data. S.O. Nielsen, C. F Lopez, G. Srinivas and M.L. Klein, Journal of Chemical Physics, 119, 7043 (2003).

  18. FRET by FET and dynamics of polymer folding. G. Srinivas, A. Yethiraj and B. Bagchi, Journal of Physical Chemistry B (Letter to the Editor), 105, 2475 (2001).

  19. Effect of orientational motion of mobile chromophores on the dynamics of Forster energy transfer in polymers. G. Srinivas and B. Bagchi, Journal of Physical chemistry B, 105, 9370 (2001).

  20. Distribution of reaction times in diffusion controlled reactions in polymers. G. Srinivas and B. Bagchi, Chemical Physics Letters 328, 420 (2000).

  21. Detection of collapsed and ordered polymer structures by fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique in stiff homopolymers: Bimodality in the reaction efficiency distribution. G. Srinivas and B. Bagchi, Journal of Chemical Physics, 116, 837 (2002).

  22. Non-exponentiality of time dependent survival probability and the fractional viscosity dependence of the rate in diffusion controlled reactions in polymer chain. G. Srinivas, A. Yethiraj and B. Bagchi, Journal of Chemical Physics, 114, 9170 (2001).

  23. Membrane bound hydraphiles assist cation translocation. G. Srinivas, C. F Lopez and M.L. Klein, Journal of Physical Chemistry B (Letter to the Editor) 108, 4231 (2004).

  24. Study of pair contact formation among hydrophobic residues in model HP-36 protein: Relationship between contact order parameter and rate of folding and collapse. G. Srinivas, and B. Bagchi, Journal of Physical chemistry B 107, 11768 (2003).

  25. Study of dynamics of protein folding through minimalistic models. G. Srinivas and B. Bagchi, Theoretical Chemistry Accounts 109, 8 (2003).

  26. Reentrant behavior of relaxation time with viscosity at varying composition in binary mixtures. A. Mukherjee, G. Srinivas, and B. Bagchi, Physical Review Letters, 86, 5926 (2001).

  27. Non-ideality in the composition dependence of viscosity in binary mixtures. G. Srinivas, A. Mukherjee and B. Bagchi, Journal of Chemical Physics, 114, 6220 (2001).

  28. Foldability and the funnel of HP-36 protein sequence: Use of hydropathy scale in protein folding. G. Srinivas and B. Bagchi, Journal of Chemical Physics 116, 8579 (2002).

  29. Time dependent survival probability in diffusion controlled reactions in a polymer chain: Beyond Wilemski-Fixman theory. G. Srinivas, K. L. Sebastian and B. Bagchi, Journal of Chemical Physics, 116, 7276 (2002).

  30. Understanding the anomalous time dependence of velocity correlation function in one-dimensional Lennard-Jones systems. G. Srinivas and B. Bagchi, Journal of Chemical Physics, 112, 7557 (2000).

  31. Computer simulation and mode coupling theory study of the effect of specific solute-solvent interactions on diffusion: Crossover from a sub-slip to super stick limit of diffusion. G. Srinivas, S. Bhattacharyya and B. Bagchi, Journal of Chemical Physics, 110, 4477 (1999).

  32. Computer simulation and mode-coupling theory analysis of time-dependent diffusion in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluids. S. Bhattacharyya, G. Srinivas and B. Bagchi, Physics Letters A, 266, 394 (2000).

  33. The Enskog theory for self-diffusion coefficients of simple fluids with continuous potentials. K. Miyazaki, G. Srinivas and B. Bagchi, Condensed Matter Physics, 4, 315 (2001).

  34. The Enskog theory for transport coefficients of simple liquids with continuous potentials. K. Miyazaki, G. Srinivas, and B. Bagchi, Journal of Chemical Physics, 114, 6276 (2001).

  35. The Enskog theory for classical vibrational energy relaxation in fluids with continuous potentials. B. Bagchi, G. Srinivas, and K. Miyazaki, Journal of Chemical Physics, 115, 4195 (2001).

  36. Intermittency, Current flows and short time diffusion in interacting one-dimensional fluids. Subrata Pal, G. Srinivas, S. Bhattacharyya and B. Bagchi. Journal of Chemical Physics, 116, 5941 (2002).

  37. Energy transfer efficiency distribution in polymers in solution during folding and unfolding. G. Srinivas and B. Bagchi, Phys Chem Comm 8, 1 (2002).

  38. Folding and Unfolding of Chicken Villin Headpiece: Energy Landscape of a Single Domain Model Protein. G. Srinivas and B. Bagchi, Current Science 82, 179 (2002) (Cover Article).

  39. Relaxation in binary mixtures: Nonideality, heterogeneity and reentrance. A. Mukherjee, G. Srinivas, S. Bhattacharyya and B. Bagchi, Proceedings of Indian Academy of Sciences, Chemical Sciences 113, 393 (2001).